New Lead Paint Rules issued by the Environmental Protection Agency are now in effect and affects all homes built prior to 1978.

The EPA’s New Lead Paint Requirements for Builders and Remodelers

On April 22, 2010, a contractor performing any type of renovation, repair and painting projects that disturb lead-based paint in homes, child care facilities, and schools built before 1978, must now be an EPA-approved certified renovator and must follow specific work practices to prevent lead contamination.

When working on a home that test positive for lead paint, the EPA lead paint approved renovator  must use lead-safe work practices and follow these three procedures:

  • Contain the work area.
  • Minimize dust.
  • Clean up thoroughly.

Although the Environmental Protection Agency, the EPA, makes it sound as though these are very simple procedures, in reality they are not quite so easy. These procedures can quickly become very complex and can sometimes become quite costly. From the initial intrusive lead paint test itself, to the workers having to wear hazmat type suits in the contaminate areas, the procedure can become quite “interesting.” Oddly enough, after all of these safety precautions are taken to protect the home’s occupants and keeping the lead dust contained so as not to enter the surrounding atmosphere, they then simply allow you to dispose of the debris in any dumpster. Go figure.

Now, even though this new rule will cover an estimated 79 million homes, the EPA itself estimates that a significantly smaller number of homes — about 38 million — still contain lead paint. Luckily, the Tampa Bay area is said to have relatively few homes with lead paint.

This new rule now requires remodelers and all other contractors disturbing more than six square feet of painted surfaces in pre-1978 homes, to dictate lead-safe work practices, pre-renovation consumer education and record keeping of work done.

The EPA has also partnered with the non-profit Ad Council and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development on a public relations campaign to help increase home-owner awareness of the rule.

The EPA said it was working on providing NAHB members with clarification on how the rule will apply to homes that were under construction before 1978 but not completed until after that time, when lead paint was no longer allowed.

The rule also requires remodelers to give records to their customers within 30 days of completing the job, including a checklist confirming that they followed the required lead-safe work practice steps.

American Housing Builders, Inc. and American Housing Remodeling, Inc. are now EPA lead paint certified and can handle all jobs that present itself. Please feel free to call us for more information at 727-546-6611, or simply go to the “Contact Us” page of our website and send a request for more information.

Click here to read more on the new EPA Lead Paint rule.

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